Physical Activity

Physical Activity Research

Poor diet, physical inactivity and obesity are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The Physical Activity Research theme targets important determinants of these conditions, and focuses on policy and practice-relevant interventions to inform national and international efforts to improve eating habits, increase physical activity, and prevent obesity.

 

Our current research highlights

Text4Heart

This study involves a randomised controlled study to evaluate the long-term (1 year) effectiveness of a mobile phone delivered comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) programme on adherence to lifestyle change compared to usual care (encouragement to attend CR). The programme, Text4Heart, consists of a package of text messages and an interactive website to increase and maintain positive lifestyle changes.  We will use data from the ANZACS-QI registry and data linkage to assess outcomes at 1 year post-randomisation.

This project is being undertaken in partnership with Auckland District Health Board and Waitemata District Health Board.

Funded by The Health Research Council (Partnership Grant).

For more information please contact Rachel Sullivan

REMOTE

REMOTE seeks to compare the effectiveness of technology-assisted, home-based, remote monitored programme of exercise (TexCR) to standard supervised cardiac rehabilitation (exCR) in New Zealand adults with a diagnosis of ischaemeic heart disease.

 

A two-arm randomised controlled non-inferiority trial is being conducted to demonstrate that TexCR is as effective as existing exCR on exercise capacity measured at 12 weeks. Participants (160) will be randomized at 1:1 ratio either to receive TexCR or exCR. The 12 week TexCR intervention will involve a personalised programme of exercise prescription provided via a smartphone, remote physiological monitoring of exercise sessions by an exercise physiologist, and behavioural support to continue to exercise on a regular basis (including regular feedback on their progress and tailoring of the programme).